The State of Sales from Adult Hot Lines to Industrial Suppliers

According to the US Department of Labor Statistics in 2015 there are 14.4 Million people employed in Sales. That number includes inside and outside sales people from the person in the blue shirt at Best Buy to the top performer in the Armani Suite. Taking a closer look according to Indeed.com the average sales salary is $57,422 as of Jan 2020, which is  better than the average salary over all of $48, 252 per the Social Security Admin.(2019)

One of my business connections owns a Sales Training & Coaching company. From time to time I do some consulting for his company. One of the most interesting things I have done is to do Mystery Shops, where I will contact a company and act like a prospective customer to learn about their sales process.

I have Mystery Shopped a wide variety of companies from:  Weight Loss Clinics to Industrial Suppliers and even a Adult Companionship Hot Line, yup I have heard it all. Been hung up on by customer service folks, ignored, promised a call back, a price, a quote and never heard a peep. Probably the most shocking was when a VP of Sales supposedly with 25+ years in sales who said he didn’t feel comfortable making cold calls on internet leads… Yea that’s right afraid to make cold calls after 25 years of calling himself a sales person. Sorry if you can’t or won’t make cold calls you are not a Sales Person you are a highly over compensated order taker, if that fits your business model and you are growing well I am a fan of what works keep on keeping on.

What is consistent is well the lack of a sales process, and what little they do to sell is well predictable.  A pitch and a quick offer of a discount. Apparently they are all mind readers who knew what I wanted with out even asking about my situation. At first it was rather surprising, that people who say they are in sales but don’t qualify, present, close or even get my contact information so they can follow up. Yet many had at least some training. The true benefit of a sales process it two fold it is first repeatable and second it is trakable.                                                       SampleLightningDashbord

A repeatable process can be taught it is a system for success. The inputs are known as is what the output will be. You know if you make 100 calls to get 20 appointments that result in 5 sales how many calls you need to make to hit your numbers. The goal of tracking is not to rack up high call count rather the opposite. To learn what works and what doesn’t. So you can do more of what works and lower you call count and get more sales.

SalesforceMetrics (2019_10_13 20_29_39 UTC)One CEO I had coffee with told me I was the only other person he ever met that tracked my calls and know how many call backs I got from my messages, how many calls to and appointment and then to a sale. If you want to be a real success in sales track what works and what doesn’t, it can be in a CRM, on a note pad, in Excel be a scientist of sales. I happen to like the Salesforce CRM and the Sandler Sales Seven Step Sales Process. On the off chance you want to learn more go to http://www.Lrn2Sell.com.SalesForce714

Trackable makes it possible to change coarse as needed and hold people and yourself accountable right away rather than at the end of the: month,  quarter, year. You have to track what you are doing if it isn’t measurable you don’t have a system. No system and there is no way to improve it. Not sure who said it first but: Things that get measured tend to get improved. Tracking leads to accountability personal and company wide. I don’t suppose any of this makes sense in your situation if it does I can be reached at phil@salesforcemaven.com

 

About Phil Sallaway - Manager Orange County California

Manager at SalesForceMaven in Orange County California. He is a Salesforce Consultant with a strong Marketing & Sales background.
This entry was posted in CA, CRM, Orange County, Phil Sallaway, Sales, Salesforce. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s